Berkeley Bowl - Welcome
Locations and Hours
920 Heinz Avenue Berkeley, CA 94710 | Phone: 510.898.9555
2020 Oregon Street Berkeley, CA 94703 | Phone: 510.843.6929
Mon. - Sat. - 9:00 am to 8:00 pm | Sunday - 10:00 am to 7:00 pm

Bulk Foods, Cooking Beans, Peas & Lentils

Cooking Instructions

Beans (soaked)

Simmer in Saucepan

Pressure Cooker at 15lb Pressure

Black Beans

1 to 1½ hours

5 to 8 Min.

Garbanzo Beans

1 to 1½ hours

5 to 7 Min.

Great Northerns

1 to 1½ hours

5 to 7 Min.

Lima Beans, Large

45 to 60 minutes

Not Recommended

Lima Beans, Baby

1 hour

Not Recommended

Navy or Small Whites

1 to 1½ hours

5 to 8 Min.

Pink Beans

1 to 1½ hours

6 to 8 Min.

Pinto Beans

1 to 1½ hours

5 to 7 Min.

Red Beans

1 to 1½ hours

6 to 8 Min.

Red Kidney Beans

1 to 1½ hours

5 to 8 Min

Soybeans

3 hours

12 to 15 Min.

Beans (not soaked)

Simmer in Saucepan

Pressure Cooker

Black-Eyed Peas

1 to 1½ hours

Not Recommended

Lentils

30 to 45 minutes

Not Recommended

Split Peas, Green

30 to 45 minutes

Not Recommended

Soaking the Beans

Soak most beans in three times their volume of cold water for six hours before cooking.
Do not add salt or acidic ingredients, like vinegar, tomatoes or juice, this will slow the cooking process. Instead, add these ingredients when the beans are just tender. Always discard the water in which they were soaked.

Cooking Liquid

Use 6 cups of liquid to 2 cups of beans.


Cooking Lentils

Split peas and lentils don’t need to be soaked. They take about 30 minutes to cook. The best way is to put them in cold water; bring them to a gentle boil, remove from heat and allow them to remain in the water for 1 to 2 hours only.

Cooking the Beans

The best cookware for beans is a heavy metal pot or saucepan. Stainless steel, cast aluminum, or cast iron are all excellent. Bring the beans to a simmer, and then lower the heat and simmer for 60 to 90 minutes, or until the beans are tender. NOTE: When cooking beans, always simmer. Boiling can cause the cooking liquid to overflow, as well as the beans to break apart and the skins to separate.

Oven Baking

Baking in the hot dry air of the oven is a slow process, but it’s the only way to create the wonderful glazed, crusty top characteristic of baked beans and bean pot casseroles. Traditional containers for baking beans are earthenware bean pots, usually 3 or 3½ quart size. The pot and lid should be glazed at least on the inside and must be lead-free. You can also use glass or ceramic casseroles. Beans are done when they can be easily mashed between two fingers or with a fork. Always test a few beans in case they have not cooked evenly.

Download PDF